What Is Laser Tag? 

First of all the word LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation

Laser Tag devices incorporate variations of a simple combination of an infrared LED emitter that sends out a signal and a sensor (or receiver) that picks up the signal. It's a system that's similar to how your t.v.'s remote control works with your t.v.

The following is from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

Laser tag is a team or individual activity where players attempt to score points by tagging targets, typically with a hand-held infrared-emitting targeting device. Infrared-sensitive targets are commonly worn by each player and are sometimes integrated within the arena in which the game is played. Since its birth in 1979, with the release of the Star Trek Electronic Phasers toy manufactured by the South Bend Electronics brand of Milton Bradley, laser tag has evolved into both indoor and outdoor styles of play, and may include simulations of combat, role play-style games, or competitive sporting events including tactical configurations and precise game goals. Laser tag is popular with a wide range of ages. When compared to paintball, laser tag is painless because it uses no physical projectiles, and indoor versions may be considered less physically demanding because most indoor venues prohibit running or roughhousing.             

 Description above from the Wikipedia article Laser Tag, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors here. Community Pages are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, anyone associated with the topic.

irst of all the word LASER is an acronym for Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation.

History Of Laser Tag 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

In late 1970s and early 1980s, the United States Army deployed a system using infrared beams for combat training. The MILES system functions like laser tag in that beams are "fired" into receivers that score hits. Similar systems are now manufactured by several companies and used by various armed forces around the world.

The first known toy to use infrared light and a corresponding sensor was manufactured and marketed in 1979 as the Star Trek Electronic Phaser Guns set.

In 1982, George Carter III began the process of designing an arena-based system for playing a scored version of the game, a possibility which had initially occurred to him in 1977 while watching the film Star Wars. He opened the first Photon center in Dallas, Texas in 1984, but he was slightly preempted by the 1984 opening of Star Laser Force in Houston, TX, which was designed by Lee Weinstein, who had also been inspired by Star Wars. When doing a patent search for his patent application on the Star Laser Force system in 1984, Weinstein found that shortly after World War II, a patent had been issued on an electronic light-ray-gun game that used miniature vacuum tubes (a photomultiplier tube and a triode tube) built into a helmet along with a battery which powered the circuitry through vibrating-reed 300 volt power supply. When the photomultiplier tube got hit by light, the triode would actuate a solenoid, pulling a pin out of a spring-loaded plunger, and the helmet would fly off the head of the player who got hit. This appears to be the earliest light-ray-gun game ever invented. As far as is known, it was never commercially produced.

In Star Laser Force, the players' guns contained a xenon flash lamp who's light was focused into a beam to brightly blast opponents, and the scoring was done directly on the battle suit of the person who got blasted. This was a significantly less expensive design than the contemporaneous Photon game, and more amenable to being translated directly into a toy. The son of a member of the board of directors at Worlds of Wonder was a frequent player at Star Laser Force, and that led to Worlds of Wonder adopting the general design of Star Laser Force for their Laser Tag toy.

In 1986, the first Photon toys hit the market, nearly simultaneously with the Lazer Tag toys from Worlds of Wonder and several other similar infrared and visible light-based toys. Worlds of Wonder went out of business around 1988, and Photon soon followed in 1989, as the fad of the games wore off. Today there are laser tag arenas all over the world bearing various names and brands, as well as a large variety of consumer equipment for home play and professional grade equipment for outdoor laser tag arenas and businesses such as the Ikon-x Outdoor Laser Tag equipment at www.ikon-x.com

Description above from the Wikipedia article Laser Tag, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors here. Community Pages are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, anyone associated with the topic.